at the Times of India 175 year anniversary event #latergram #India #history #newspaper  (at Purana Qila)

at the Times of India 175 year anniversary event #latergram #India #history #newspaper (at Purana Qila)

in flight shopping is a relic

Earlier this week, on a Go-Air flight from Delhi to Mumbai, it struck me how much of a relic the notion of onboard shopping has become.

Come to think of it, the average domestic or continental international flight is probably 2.5 to 3 hours in length. What kind of urgency could strike an individual to want to make a purchase for something that will eventually still have to be delivered via mail.

I’d rather get off the flight, and use a smartphone app from Amazon or Flipkart of Myntra to seek, find and order whatever it is I’d want. 

The sheer convenience of one of these services knowing my payment preferences, remembering my shipping address, and giving me rewards points in one place is far greater than choosing to buy onboard a plane.

It is time for the airlines, and mail order catalog companies to evolve, me thinks. 

just another day in the office at TimesCity – View on Path.

just another day in the office at TimesCity – View on Path.

Computers don’t suffer present shock, people do. For we are the only ones living in time

https://medium.com/book-excerpts/ba7cc904e36d

By Douglas Rushkoff
twitter.com/rushkoff

ankjain:

I think this can change the world! 

this will change the world in profound ways! … Smartphones that hold charge for weeks, electric cars that recharge in minutes, mobile diagnostics, electric jets maybe?

mrgn:

Today’s Dilbert cartoon on startup talent acquisitions.

so true!

mrgn:

Today’s Dilbert cartoon on startup talent acquisitions.

so true!

tech media isn’t doing a good job reporting the truly interesting stuff

Too much of the tech media is obsessed with reporting the financial events around companies, rather than the products/services and innovation that occurs at these firms.

Sure there is a need to report fund raises, M&A, companies going bust etc, as they are pseudo indicators of market validation (or lack thereof); but that is only a portion of the story. I’d love to hear more about how the privacy model being proposed by the latest social network will enable users to have greater control over their data; or how this little startup innovating in imaging could change the way high-resolution pictures are captured on smartphones. 

Before blogs and tablets became mainstream, that kind of reporting was typically done in long form magazines, such as the Wired Mag or the ACM’s Queue magazine, and the new age publications aren’t quite there yet. Even the Wired magazine is still focused on getting its content published through a packaged magazine, rather than an ongoing ephemeral stream.

PandoDaily, TheNextWeb and a couple others are doing a decent job, but there is a lot more room around reporting the latest and greatest innovation in the labs at great schools like Stanford, MIT, and others. 

what do you think? … are there tech news outlets that do this particularly well in your view?

a 10 percent improvement means that you’re basically doing the same thing as everybody else. You probably won’t fail spectacularly, but you are guaranteed not to succeed wildly.

the curse of 10%

Larry Page succinctly described, in the above quote, the 10% growth syndrome that companies get into and miss out on doing great things.

Don’t get me wrong, it is extremely challenging to run a large company and motivate the team to work towards a common goal of 10% growth, but at the same time our business leaders owe a debt to society to attempt great things with the resources at their disposal

I hope more business leaders and politicians would see the roles the way Larry Page does.

You can see the entire interview with Larry Page in Wired mag here.
 

Annual Reviews

Every year in January, many of us sit down with our bosses, supervisors, and mentors to review the year past. Often these reviews are institutionalized (read:required) by our organizations, and closely tied to financial incentives (bonuses). Through the years, I have found these reviews to be a great look-back mechanism for what I achieved (or didn’t) in the past year. In conversations with friends and colleagues though, I have found that many of us don’t like these reviews as much as I seem to. So, I thought I’d write a short post to share my point of view. 

Realizing that every organization does reviews differently, encapsulating thoughts on the subject instantly starts to look like multivariate calculus to some. I distill reviews into the following measures for the individual:

  • Have you defined the right measures?
  • Are you making progress toward your long term goals?
  • Do you like your organization and your team?
  • Does your manager really care about your career?
  • Was it a good year or a bad year? 
  • How did you perform compared to your peers?

These are the questions I’ve asked myself, my team, and my organization every year. Some of these are obvious questions, and others are not. For example, the measures change through different stages of our career, life-stage, and external circumstances. 

For organizations on the other hand, annual reviews are a good way to recognize, reward, and retain their top-performers; and at the same time introspect whether they have the right mix of people to meet the goals of the business. 

How do you think about reviews? … like em? … hate em? I’d love to hear your thoughts. 

Monday afternoon chat with Mrs.

  • Mona Gandhi: hey
  • Miten Sampat: wassup?
  • Mona Gandhi: nm .. dropping some tables & databases
  • Mona Gandhi: feels good to clean up
  • Miten Sampat: drop it like its hot !
  • Mona Gandhi: haha

Reacting to competition

As an innovator, you are often ahead of the curve in introducing products and services to a market.

Then come the battery of fast following competitors who copy your capabilities, or yet others who say they’ve already got what your latest and greatest innovation is.

How you react in these situations can often make or break your leadership with customers.

Making a better product isn’t the end of the story: market it better, deliver it better, support it better, and make the usage experience better, be honest, and be human !

Take your advantage to the next level by out executing your competition across all aspects of your solution, rather than fighting with copy cats or looking at their tactics.

Competition is a good thing, and in most markets buyers will gravitate to the best overall package.

what is the future of network services? …we have an opinion #neustar #instituteforthefuture  (Taken with Instagram at Neustar)

what is the future of network services? …we have an opinion #neustar #instituteforthefuture (Taken with Instagram at Neustar)

the best magazine to get in-sync with global affairs of culture, design and some business #monocle #magazine (Taken with Instagram at London City Airport (LCY))

the best magazine to get in-sync with global affairs of culture, design and some business #monocle #magazine (Taken with Instagram at London City Airport (LCY))

BBC News - Today - Maps 'are now used to sell stuff', says author Jerry Brotton

simnett:

es» nod in the direction of the importance of online mapping (“shift as big as that between manuscript and printed maps”). Nice call out for OSM.

But the problem with the race to the bottom is that you might win
Seth Godin, full article here